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Mining could mean millions to area

Carrie Moore
Published: Thursday, May 30th, 2013

Protestors gathered in front of the Custer Volunteer Fire Department where the Dewey-Burdock Powertech uranium mining project was discussed last Wednesday. Four speakers — Dr. Ray Johnson, Dr. James Monro, Mark Hollenbeck and Ben Snow — spoke on the positives of the project and what it can do for the community. Protestors handed out material about the damage uranium mining can do in the future.

 

In a nearly packed room, representatives from the Dewey-Burdock project, as well as leading researchers from the School of Mines and the United States Geological Survey (UCGS), discussed PowerTech’s mining operation, located northwest of Edgemont near the Wyoming border. 
Uranium, a heavy, natural — yet, unstable — element can be found in the ground, seawater and in the Earth’s crust. Yellowcake, the powdery product from uranium, would be harvested from the site and used for nuclear power, medical isotopes, smoke detectors, luminous watch dials, military armor and counterweights on ships. 
“Uranium is the most powerful energy source,” said Dr. James Monro, Ph.D. and P.E. with the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. “It is two million times more powerful than chemical engineering and it leaves a small footprint since there are no carbon dioxide emissions.”
Monro said the United States will need 26 percent more electricity between now and 2030, something that uranium mining can help fulfill.
“One uranium pellet the size of the tip of your little finger is the same as 149 gallons of oil or 1,780 pounds of coal,” he said. “The substance would be shipped in 55-gallon drums and would be shipped for further processing.”

In a nearly packed room, representatives from the Dewey-Burdock project, as well as leading researchers from the School of Mines and the United States Geological Survey (UCGS), discussed PowerTech’s mining operation, located northwest of Edgemont near the Wyoming border. 

Uranium, a heavy, natural — yet, unstable — element can be found in the ground, seawater and in the Earth’s crust. Yellowcake, the powdery product from uranium, would be harvested from the site and used for nuclear power, medical isotopes, smoke detectors, luminous watch dials, military armor and counterweights on ships. 

“Uranium is the most powerful energy source,” said Dr. James Monro, Ph.D. and P.E. with the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. “It is two million times more powerful than chemical engineering and it leaves a small footprint since there are no carbon dioxide emissions.”

Monro said the United States will need 26 percent more electricity between now and 2030, something that uranium mining can help fulfill.

“One uranium pellet the size of the tip of your little finger is the same as 149 gallons of oil or 1,780 pounds of coal,” he said. “The substance would be shipped in 55-gallon drums and would be shipped for further processing.”

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Current Comments

1 comments so far (post your own)
Gardner Gray
June 2nd, 2013 at 11:33am

Dr. James Monroe is on the PowerTech payroll which automatically puts his statements ion question. The concern is not about the uranium or how safe it is. The issue is the uranium compounds that are produced by the process and they are radioactive. You cannot clean radioactive material or by-product. Other dangerous chemicals such as arsenic are also in the mix. By requiring up to 8000 gallons a minute for up to twenty years with the absolute and obvious danger of contamination of that clean water by radioactive compounds, entire aquifers will be ruined. This operation will not provide dozens of high paying jobs for the area residents unless you count Mark Hollenbeck's and Dr. monroe's income from a lobbyist position/ spokesperson. In what ways will this operation provide jobs, how many, at what pay, for how long?

Nuclear power and its need for uranium pellets is on the wain as there are no new power plants in process. Japan, Canada and Europe are the same. And there is yet to be a process of safe removal of the spent rods. Nuclear power is a weak position to take.

Of course we will need more energy but nuclear/uranium mining/wasted water are not the way to proceed and Ms. Moore knows this. With Power Tech's stock tanked at six cents and no money coming in and investors worried about how Power Tech has managed its financials, these kind of statements are not worthy of attention.



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