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EMT gets DUI while driving ambulance

Jason Ferguson
Published: Thursday, January 31st, 2013

A long-time member of the Custer Ambulance Service was fired after being arrested for Driving Under the Influence while responding to a medical call in one of the service’s ambulances.
Sherri McDermet, 51, was arrested Monday, Dec. 10, by Custer County Sheriff’s deputy Nathan Chowning with a blood alcohol content of .172 after responding to a medical call on Needles Drive.
In Chowning’s incident report, he states that he made contact with the female inside the residence who was in need of medical assistance upon arriving on scene, and noting that she was in stable condition, he went outside to wait for the ambulance.
McDermet, who was a paid member of the ambulance service staff, arrived in the ambulance and conversed with Chowning. It was at that time he detected the odor of alcohol.
“I thought it was emitting from her breath, but I was not sure,” Chowning wrote in his report.
Eventually, the patient was loaded in the ambulance. After another brief exchange in which Chowning said he did not smell the odor of alcohol, McDermet drove the patient to the hospital. At that point, Chowning made contact with the president of the ambulance service, Jim Sanders. He explained the situation and Sanders asked Chowning to check McDermet with a Preliminary Breath Test (PBT) and advise him of the results.

A long-time member of the Custer Ambulance Service was fired after being arrested for Driving Under the Influence while responding to a medical call in one of the service’s ambulances.

Sherri McDermet, 51, was arrested Monday, Dec. 10, by Custer County Sheriff’s deputy Nathan Chowning with a blood alcohol content of .172 after responding to a medical call on Needles Drive.

In Chowning’s incident report, he states that he made contact with the female inside the residence who was in need of medical assistance upon arriving on scene, and noting that she was in stable condition, he went outside to wait for the ambulance.

McDermet, who was a paid member of the ambulance service staff, arrived in the ambulance and conversed with Chowning. It was at that time he detected the odor of alcohol.

“I thought it was emitting from her breath, but I was not sure,” Chowning wrote in his report.

Eventually, the patient was loaded in the ambulance. After another brief exchange in which Chowning said he did not smell the odor of alcohol, McDermet drove the patient to the hospital. At that point, Chowning made contact with the president of the ambulance service, Jim Sanders. He explained the situation and Sanders asked Chowning to check McDermet with a Preliminary Breath Test (PBT) and advise him of the results.

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Current Comments

1 comments so far (post your own)
Loretta
January 31st, 2013 at 04:44am

WOW Thats horrible! Nothing like putting that person life in danger along with how many others...sad

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