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Print version much better than online

Parker Knox
Published: Thursday, September 20th, 2012

I could relate to one of the morning TV news show hosts the other day when, in introducing the executive editor of The New York Times, he literally hugged his copy of the Times to his chest.
As one who has been an admitted newspaper junkie for as long as he can remember—at least way back to grade school days in Onida when I produced the class paper at home and then took it to school for everybody to read—I consider any day that doesn't begin with the morning paper to be a day unfulfilled.
The first sound for which I listen each morning is not the rooster crowing nor the neighborhood dog barking nor the garbage truck's monotone beep-beep-beep as it backs up to the dumpster. Rather it's the sound of the newspaper delivery guy's car as he weaves his way through the driveway of my apartment complex and the thump as the rolled-up newspaper slams against my front door.
Sometimes the guy's aim is off target. I occasionally find the paper in the bushes. Once I located it on top of my car. But that was better than the recent day when the paper didn't show up at all.
My summer schedule of primarily nighttime work—93 baseball games in all covered for the local newspaper—left my mornings relatively free. Now, with the start of school, that won't be the case most of the time. Guess I'll have to arise a bit early so I can get my coffee made and the paper read before I venture out.
If you are reading this column, then you likely are one who needs his newspaper. Whether you read it first thing in the morning or later in the day when you get to it or even days later when you finally have time, you know the pleasure of turning to the page of your choice in the order you choose, skimming over some pages, staying with others longer, perhaps going directly to your favorite section first. The comics? The ball scores? The editorial? The obituaries? The front-page headlines? The political columns? The letters to the editor?

I could relate to one of the morning TV news show hosts the other day when, in introducing the executive editor of The New York Times, he literally hugged his copy of the Times to his chest.

As one who has been an admitted newspaper junkie for as long as he can remember—at least way back to grade school days in Onida when I produced the class paper at home and then took it to school for everybody to read—I consider any day that doesn't begin with the morning paper to be a day unfulfilled.

The first sound for which I listen each morning is not the rooster crowing nor the neighborhood dog barking nor the garbage truck's monotone beep-beep-beep as it backs up to the dumpster. Rather it's the sound of the newspaper delivery guy's car as he weaves his way through the driveway of my apartment complex and the thump as the rolled-up newspaper slams against my front door.

Sometimes the guy's aim is off target. I occasionally find the paper in the bushes. Once I located it on top of my car. But that was better than the recent day when the paper didn't show up at all.

My summer schedule of primarily nighttime work—93 baseball games in all covered for the local newspaper—left my mornings relatively free. Now, with the start of school, that won't be the case most of the time. Guess I'll have to arise a bit early so I can get my coffee made and the paper read before I venture out.

If you are reading this column, then you likely are one who needs his newspaper. Whether you read it first thing in the morning or later in the day when you get to it or even days later when you finally have time, you know the pleasure of turning to the page of your choice in the order you choose, skimming over some pages, staying with others longer, perhaps going directly to your favorite section first. The comics? The ball scores? The editorial? The obituaries? The front-page headlines? The political columns? The letters to the editor?

Available only in the print version of the Custer County Chronicle. To subscribe, call 605-673-2217.



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