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Addictions are so, well ... addicting

Norma Najacht
Published: Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Addictions: don’t we all have them? It’s how we deal with stress. My own addiction is well known around the office and Carrie has suggested that I “come clean” in admitting my problem.
It started as a child, and as we all know, those long-standing addictions are the strongest. 
My addiction has been with me for as long as I can remember, so it evidently started at a very young age. I try to keep temptation out of my home, but sometimes that’s impossible. For every addiction, there is an enabler. In my case, that would be Charley.
In my saner moments, I instruct him not to buy me any more of my addictive substance, no matter how much I wheedle, cajole, threaten or beg him. Regardless of what excuses I give him about how much I need it, he is not to give in to me or take pity on me. However, he often gives in just to keep the peace. If he doesn’t, I buy it myself. 
And if the truth be known, Charley actually shares in my addiction. (Although he is in denial about that.)
I suppose I could blame my parents for my addiction, as they were the first to encourage it — not knowing, of course, the course my life would take and the hold it would sway over me.
Some of the questions to determine if you have an addiction are:
1. Do you find you need more of the addictive substance to get the desired effect or that the same amount has less of an effect on you?
2. Do you feel sick, unwell or just uncomfortable when the effect of the addictive substance wears off or do you take more of it or a similar substance to relieve or avoid feeling unwell (or just to feel generally better again)?

Addictions: don’t we all have them? It’s how we deal with stress. My own addiction is well known around the office and Carrie has suggested that I “come clean” in admitting my problem.

It started as a child, and as we all know, those long-standing addictions are the strongest. 

My addiction has been with me for as long as I can remember, so it evidently started at a very young age. I try to keep temptation out of my home, but sometimes that’s impossible. For every addiction, there is an enabler. In my case, that would be Charley.

In my saner moments, I instruct him not to buy me any more of my addictive substance, no matter how much I wheedle, cajole, threaten or beg him. Regardless of what excuses I give him about how much I need it, he is not to give in to me or take pity on me. However, he often gives in just to keep the peace. If he doesn’t, I buy it myself. 

And if the truth be known, Charley actually shares in my addiction. (Although he is in denial about that.)

I suppose I could blame my parents for my addiction, as they were the first to encourage it — not knowing, of course, the course my life would take and the hold it would sway over me.

Some of the questions to determine if you have an addiction are:

1. Do you find you need more of the addictive substance to get the desired effect or that the same amount has less of an effect on you?

2. Do you feel sick, unwell or just uncomfortable when the effect of the addictive substance wears off or do you take more of it or a similar substance to relieve or avoid feeling unwell (or just to feel generally better again)?

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