Custer County Chronicle

Home   »  Opinion

Bookmark and Share

Email This Article  

Students are smarter these days

Parker Knox
Published: Thursday, November 1st, 2012

I first must tell you that, back in 1956, I was salutatorian of the graduating class at Onida High School. 
That's supposed to mean something, and it does. It apparently means that I had the second-highest grade-point average by the time we reached our final semester.
There also is something that that honor does not mean. It definitely does not mean that I was the second-smartest senior in that class. People like Dan Eliason, Tom Terbush and Laurence Byrum, among others, come immediately to mind.
It's no secret, at least not to me, that I took an easier load of classes than some people in that class.  Easier to me, that is. Thank God for electives! I certainly didn't want to sign up for classes I didn't like, didn't understand and didn't enjoy. And I especially didn't want to take classes at which I wasn't going to excel. So I managed to escape chemistry, physics, advanced algebra and the like. 
Now you know why I didn't become an engineer.  Or a mathematician. Or a researcher. Or a scientist.  Or a doctor. Or anything else that pays well.
You hadn't better be thinking about that old not-so-funny joke that those who can't do anything else end up as teachers. I know for a fact that is not the case because in 18 years of teaching, I was in the company of some excellent ones, and before that I was lucky to be a student of some positively great teachers.
But I hate not knowing so much about so many things. The path of courses through which I breezed may have a lot to do with that.

I first must tell you that, back in 1956, I was salutatorian of the graduating class at Onida High School. 

That's supposed to mean something, and it does. It apparently means that I had the second-highest grade-point average by the time we reached our final semester.

There also is something that that honor does not mean. It definitely does not mean that I was the second-smartest senior in that class. People like Dan Eliason, Tom Terbush and Laurence Byrum, among others, come immediately to mind.

It's no secret, at least not to me, that I took an easier load of classes than some people in that class.  Easier to me, that is. Thank God for electives! I certainly didn't want to sign up for classes I didn't like, didn't understand and didn't enjoy. And I especially didn't want to take classes at which I wasn't going to excel. So I managed to escape chemistry, physics, advanced algebra and the like. 

Now you know why I didn't become an engineer.  Or a mathematician. Or a researcher. Or a scientist.  Or a doctor. Or anything else that pays well.

You hadn't better be thinking about that old not-so-funny joke that those who can't do anything else end up as teachers. I know for a fact that is not the case because in 18 years of teaching, I was in the company of some excellent ones, and before that I was lucky to be a student of some positively great teachers.

But I hate not knowing so much about so many things. The path of courses through which I breezed may have a lot to do with that.

Available only in the print version of the Custer County Chronicle. To subscribe, call 605-673-2217.



Click Here To See More Stories Like This

Current Comments

0 comments so far (post your own)

Leave your comment:

Name:

Email:

Website:

Comments:


Enter the text as it is shown below:



Please enter text
This extra step helps prevent automated abuse of this feature. Please enter the characters exactly as you see them.
 

Note: Emails will not be visible or used in any way. Please keep comments relevant. Any content deemed inappropriate or offensive may be deleted.

Advanced Search

Keywords:


Filter Search:
Classified Ads
News Articles
Event Calendar
Archive

Date Range:
From:
To: