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IBC looked at; fees ‘too high’

Jason Ferguson
Published: Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

The Custer City Council took the first step toward  making the International Building Code (IBC) the law of the land in Custer, but not before a public hearing that saw a local realtor question some accompanying building permit fees that were set to be passed through a separate ordinance.
Ramona Flaig conceded that the IBC is probably the way to go in terms of outlining minimum guidelines the city would use for property maintenance for both commercial and residential property, but said she felt some of the items within the code would be hard on some. She said she would like to see programs that help people meet some of the code standards.
City community development director Rex Harris said the city was “10 to 15” years behind in moving to the IBC, which most communities in the area have done long ago. Currently, the city follows the Uniform Building Code (UBC) for property maintenance, but Harris said the UBC is outdated.
The council approved the first reading of the IBC later in the meeting, and learned the IBC is “town specific,” meaning if the city has ordinances that are more strict than IBC guidelines, those city ordinances override the IBC. Harris said the city’s planning commission reviewed the IBC and recommended approval at the council level.

The Custer City Council took the first step toward  making the International Building Code (IBC) the law of the land in Custer, but not before a public hearing that saw a local realtor question some accompanying building permit fees that were set to be passed through a separate ordinance.

Ramona Flaig conceded that the IBC is probably the way to go in terms of outlining minimum guidelines the city would use for property maintenance for both commercial and residential property, but said she felt some of the items within the code would be hard on some. She said she would like to see programs that help people meet some of the code standards.

City community development director Rex Harris said the city was “10 to 15” years behind in moving to the IBC, which most communities in the area have done long ago. Currently, the city follows the Uniform Building Code (UBC) for property maintenance, but Harris said the UBC is outdated.

The council approved the first reading of the IBC later in the meeting, and learned the IBC is “town specific,” meaning if the city has ordinances that are more strict than IBC guidelines, those city ordinances override the IBC. Harris said the city’s planning commission reviewed the IBC and recommended approval at the council level.

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