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New code adoptions stall

Jason Ferguson
Published: Thursday, December 5th, 2013

 

Rex Harris was a wanted man Monday night.
Withâ��Harris absent from Monday night’s regular meeting of the Custer City Council, the council passed the first reading of one item with the stipulation that more clarification was needed before the second reading would be passed. Additionally, three more agenda items were tabled altogether since Harris was not present to answer questions. All of the items in question dealt with building and maintenance codes and fees, something Harris handles for the city as community development director.
The first reading of the city’s move to adopting the International Property Maintenance Code as part of its ordinances was passed, but not before a great deal of discussion and the stipulation that more questions would need to be answered before the second reading would be passed, or even brought before the council.
The code, which can be found at city hall or on the city’s website, lays out minimum guidelines the city would use for property maintenance for both commercial and residential property. Mayor Gary Lipp said the code has been adopted by other municipalities in the area with good success.
“It’s been tried and proven it’s a good guideline to have,”â��he said.â��“It’s consistent. The communities using it have been really successful.”
The city can pick and choose which sections of the code it adopts and would regulate such issues as lawn maintenance, junk cars and dilapidated buildings.
The code would also protect renters by giving the city the tool it needs to make sure landlords are providing their tenants liveable quarters.

Rex Harris was a wanted man Monday night.

Withâ��Harris absent from Monday night’s regular meeting of the Custer City Council, the council passed the first reading of one item with the stipulation that more clarification was needed before the second reading would be passed. Additionally, three more agenda items were tabled altogether since Harris was not present to answer questions. All of the items in question dealt with building and maintenance codes and fees, something Harris handles for the city as community development director.

The first reading of the city’s move to adopting the International Property Maintenance Code as part of its ordinances was passed, but not before a great deal of discussion and the stipulation that more questions would need to be answered before the second reading would be passed, or even brought before the council.

The code, which can be found at city hall or on the city’s website, lays out minimum guidelines the city would use for property maintenance for both commercial and residential property. Mayor Gary Lipp said the code has been adopted by other municipalities in the area with good success.

“It’s been tried and proven it’s a good guideline to have,”â��he said.â��“It’s consistent. The communities using it have been really successful.”

The city can pick and choose which sections of the code it adopts and would regulate such issues as lawn maintenance, junk cars and dilapidated buildings.

The code would also protect renters by giving the city the tool it needs to make sure landlords are providing their tenants liveable quarters.

Available only in the print version of the Custer County Chronicle. To subscribe, call 605-673-2217.

 



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