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East county residents ‘rough it’ during storm

Jason Ferguson
Published: Thursday, October 17th, 2013

As the cleanup continues and the last homes are reconnected to power following an early October blizzard that ravaged the Black Hills, many of those who were without power for a few days are more thankful than ever for electricity. And some are wondering how they ever got so dependent on such creature comforts.
Dana Kizzier of Hermosa lost her power the morning of Oct. 4, as the blizzard began to pick up steam. Thinking the outage would be for only a short while, she decided to make use of her time by cleaning her house. Since her home is all electric, she continued to pile on clothing while she worked.
“I kept telling myself I was tough; I could take it and it would be over soon,” she said. “By late night, I began to understand this might be more serious than usual.”
Kizzier put on a head lamp and worked on her computer (typing in Microsoft Word, as the internet was also out) until close to midnight, when the battery on her computer died. She then read for a while and attempted to write a letter, but “couldn’t read her own writing,” decided the exercise was counterproductive and went to bed, still bundled up and wearing two pairs of wool socks. She was up on and off throughout the night until she finally piled enough blankets on herself to stay warm.

As the cleanup continues and the last homes are reconnected to power following an early October blizzard that ravaged the Black Hills, many of those who were without power for a few days are more thankful than ever for electricity. And some are wondering how they ever got so dependent on such creature comforts.

Dana Kizzier of Hermosa lost her power the morning of Oct. 4, as the blizzard began to pick up steam. Thinking the outage would be for only a short while, she decided to make use of her time by cleaning her house. Since her home is all electric, she continued to pile on clothing while she worked.

“I kept telling myself I was tough; I could take it and it would be over soon,” she said. “By late night, I began to understand this might be more serious than usual.”

Kizzier put on a head lamp and worked on her computer (typing in Microsoft Word, as the internet was also out) until close to midnight, when the battery on her computer died. She then read for a while and attempted to write a letter, but “couldn’t read her own writing,” decided the exercise was counterproductive and went to bed, still bundled up and wearing two pairs of wool socks. She was up on and off throughout the night until she finally piled enough blankets on herself to stay warm.

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